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Research

We coordinate and fund epilepsy research into the causes, diagnosis and treatment of the condition, and its impact on all aspects of life for children, young people and their families.

We focus on three key workstreams, with over 40 current projects, some with international reach. Find out more about these below and how you can support, strengthen and fund our vital research work.

Our three key workstreams

Our research partnership is led by the Prince of Wales’s Chair of Childhood Epilepsy, Professor Helen Cross OBE, President of the International League Against Epilepsy, Director of UCL GOS-ICH and Young Epilepsy Trustee. We work in partnership with Great Ormond Street Hospital and University College London Great Ormond Street - Institute of Child Health across three key workstreams:


1. Understanding childhood epilepsies

Around half of people diagnosed with epilepsy never learn the cause of it. But the sooner we know the cause of someone’s epilepsy, the sooner we know how else it is affecting them, and how best to manage and treat it. Early epilepsy diagnosis is also better for the person’s understanding of their condition.


2. Outstanding treatment

Epilepsy treatments have not changed very much in recent years, and it can take a long time to find the right combination of treatments for each person. This is very hard on children, young people and their families. So, it is crucial that we make advances in imaging, surgery, dietetics, genomics, targeted treatments, and new medicines, if we are to effectively treat and one day perhaps cure, every epilepsy.


3. Outstanding support

It’s important to know what epilepsy is and how to treat it. But it’s also crucial that we tackle the wider challenges associated with growing up with epilepsy and treating childhood epilepsy. We can then put in place the right systems and supports for children, young people and their families.

For information about these studies and how your funding could help, please contact research@youngepilepsy.org.uk

 

How can I get involved in Young Epilepsy’s research?

E-CURe is a dedicated network of young people with epilepsy and their parents/caregivers. Their experience help us to develop research projects across our workstreams, strengthening the voice of children and young people in all our research. If you’d like to add your voice, to strengthen our work and make sure our research is answering the right questions in the right way, please sign up to the E-CURe network.

Help fund world-leading studies

We are currently fundraising for studies to change the way childhood epilepsy is diagnosed, treated and supported. Examples of our key ongoing projects include:

1. An innovative OPM-MEG  brain scanner for children and young people

2. Mapping patterns for earlier treatment in epilepsy  

3. The Mental Health Intervention for Children with Epilepsy (MICE) project

For information about these studies and how your funding could help, please contact research@youngepilepsy.org.uk

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OPM-MEG

The cutting-edge technology that is transforming epilepsy diagnosis for children and young people.

Find out more

An innovative OPM-MEG brain scanner for children and young people

We aim to transform the experience of epilepsy diagnosis for children, young people and their families through this innovative diagnostic technology.

Optically pumped magnetoencephalography (OPM-MEG) is the result of a collaboration between:

  • Young Epilepsy’s Research team
  • University of Nottingham
  • University College London's Institute of Neurology
  • UCL Wellcome Centre for Human Neuroimaging
  • Magnetic Shields Ltd
  • Cerca Magnetics

Read more here about OPM-MEG 

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Research Reports

Take a look at all our past Research and Impact reports to find out more about our epilepsy research, including key projects, all current projects, completed projects, our research partners, strategy and impact, and much more.

Click here

Find out more about our research

Mapping patterns for earlier treatment in epilepsy  

We are following over 100 children we saw as babies with epilepsy. We hope to understand what causes their epilepsy and the longer-term impact on their physical and mental health, wellbeing and education. We will map patterns in their epilepsy to get to the right diagnosis and treatment much faster than is currently possible.

For example, if we see a pattern in a two-year-old child and can prove it indicates an epilepsy not usually recognised until the age of seven or eight, we can start the best treatment five to six years earlier. This may significantly reduce the impact of epilepsy on their health, life, and wellbeing.


The Mental Health Intervention for Children with Epilepsy (MICE) project

At least half of young people with epilepsy also have mental health problems. These difficulties have a significant impact on the quality of life of the young people with epilepsy and their families. Despite this, existing epilepsy services are separate from mental health services and mental health problems in young people with epilepsy may not be identified or treated as well as they could be.

The MICE study is testing evidence-based psychological treatments for young people with epilepsy and mental problems, aiming to improve the treatment of mental health problems in young people with epilepsy in the future.

The project Is led by UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children.


You can find out more about our epilepsy research, including key projects, all current projects, completed projects, our research partners, strategy and impact in our latest Research and Impact report

Click here to read the latest report

Privacy Notice: EPIPEG Participants for T6 study.

together we create possible

Children and young people with epilepsy need your help urgently because without support, epilepsy can impact them now and for the rest of their lives.

Donate today!